72: Obstinate Silence.

Though a stern true-born Englishman, and fully prejudiced against all other nations, he had discernment enough to see, and candour enough to censure, the cold reserve too common among Englishmen towards strangers: “Sir,” said he, “two men of any other nation who are shown into aroom together, at a house where they are both visitors, will immediately find some conversation. But two Englishmen will probably go each to a different window, and remain in obstinate silence. Sir, we as yet do not enough understand the common rights of humanity.”

(James Boswell, The Life of Samuel Johnson, Vol. 2. New York: George Dearborn & Co., 1837, p. 335).

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72: Obstinate Silence.