120: A Blow with a Word.

It is an old saying, “A blow with a word strikes deeper than a blow with a sword;” and many men are as much galled with a calumny, a scurrilous and bitter jest, a libel, a pasquil, satire, apologue, epigram, stage-play or the like, as with any misfortune whatsoever. Princes and potentates that are otherwise happy, and have all at command, secure and free, quibus potentia sceleris impunitatem fecit, are grievously vexed with these pasquilling libels and satires; they fear a railing Aretine, more than an enemy in the field, which made most princes of his time (as some relate) “allow him a liberal pension, that he should not tax them in his satires.”

(Robert Burton, The Anatomy of Melancholy. London: Duckworth & Co., 1905, p. 446).

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120: A Blow with a Word.