453: Digno de Nota.

Para a mentalidade média do nosso tempo a utilidade das ciências é determinada segundo as aplicações práticas: a física e a química, que nos forneceram a luz elétrica e os gases asfixiantes, são as ciências úteis; a história e a filosofia, que não nos fornecem nada, são ciências “inúteis”. Apelo desta sentença para a sabedoria de certos homens práticos, que disso entendem muito bem. Certos regimes, ditos totalitários, acharam indispensável regular pela força o estudo das ciências, cujas conseqüências práticas poderiam abalar estes regimes. Ora, que vemos nós, com surpresa? Estes regimes não se ocupam, absolutamente, com as ciências “práticas”, a física e a química, que continuam bem tranqüilas. Mas as ciências totalmente inúteis, a história, a filosofia, os estudos literários, são justamente as favoritas dos regimes totalitários, que as abraçam até sufocá-las. É digno de nota.

Mas o que é ainda mais notável é uma certa coincidência. Sabemos que a Universidade, Universitas Litterarum, é uma criação da Idade Média. Ora, os ditos regimes não se ocupam com as ciências naturais, que a Idade Média conhecia pouco, e que se juntaram mais tarde à Universidade. Tratam somente das “velhas” ciências, das Litterae, que na Idade Média já eram conhecidas, e que formam a verdadeira alma da Universidade. Está claro. Foram justamente estas Litterae que formaram os caracteres das nações; e aquele que desejar transformar uma nação deverá transformá-las integralmente. Eles sabem o que é uma universidade.

(Otto Maria Carpeaux, A Cinza do Purgatório. Santa Catarina: Livraria Danúbio Editora, 2015, p. 241).

Anúncios
453: Digno de Nota.

452: Habit.

The acquisition of a new habit, or the leaving off of an old one, we must take care to launch ourselves with as strong and decided an initiative as possible. Accumulate all the possible circumstances which shall reenforce the right motives; put yourself assiduously in conditions that encourage the new way; make engagements incompatible with the old; take a public pledge, if the case allows; in short, envelop your resolution with every aid you know. This will give your new beginning such a momentum that the temptation to break down will not occur as soon as it otherwise might; and every day during which a breakdown is postponed adds to the chances of its not occurring at all. […]

Never suffer an exception to occur till the new habit is securely rooted in your life. Each lapse is like the letting fall of a ball of string which one is carefully winding up; a single slip undoes more than a great many turns will wind again. Continuity of training is the great means of making the nervous system act infallibly right. […]

All expert opinion would agree that abrupt acquisition of the new habit is the best way, if there be a real possibility of carrying it out. We must be careful not to give the will so stiff a task as to insure its defeat at the very outset; but, provided one can stand it, a sharp period of suffering, and then a free time, is the best thing to aim at, whether in giving up a habit like that of opium, or in simply changing one’s hours of rising or of work. It is surprising how soon a desire will die of inanition if it be never fed. […]

Seize the very first possible opportunity to act on every resolution you make, and on every emotional prompting you may experience in the direction of the habits you aspire to gain. It is not in the moment of their forming, but in the moment of their producing motor effects, that resolves and aspirations communicate the new ‘set’ to the brain.

(William James, Habit. New York: Henry Holt & Company, 1914, pp. 55–59).

452: Habit.

451: An Idea Only of the Last Ten Minutes.

That our primary obligation is to increase human happiness, or decrease misery, is an idea only of the last ten minutes, historically speaking. The human race in general has always supposed that its primary moral obligation lies elsewhere: in being holy, or in being virtuous, or in practicing some specific virtue: loyalty or courage, for example. An obligation to increase the general happiness has occupied little if any place in most moral systems, whether of the learned or of the ignorant. But for the contemporaries of whom I am speaking, anything morally more important than human happiness is simply inconceivable. You can easily tell that this is so, by asking any of them to mention an example of something which they regard as extremely morally bad. You will find that what they give, in every case, is an example which turns essentially on pain.

(David Stove, On Enlightenment. New Brunswick: Transaction Publishers, 2003, p.173)

451: An Idea Only of the Last Ten Minutes.

449: A Drama Soliloquized.

In a true oration, the orator plays all parts, in order to create surprise, to consider his subject in a new point of view, to practise a sudden illusion on his hearers, or to work conviction on their minds. An oration is an extremely lively, ingenious, alternating representation of the inward contemplation of a subject. Sometimes the orator interrogates, sometimes he replies; next he carries on a sort of dialogue, then he narrates; now he appeare to forget his subject, in order suddenly to recur to it; now he feigns conviction, in order more cunningly to wound his opponent; now he puts on an air of artlessness, or courage, or pity; now he apostrophizes this subject, now that; sometimes it is a peasant he addresses, sometimes even an inanimate thing. In short, an oration is a drama soliloquized. It is only the natural, straight-forward orator, who deserves that name. The timid or declamatory speaker is no orator. The genuine oration is in the style of the high comedy, interwoven occasionally with passages of lofty poetry, but else running on in the clear, simple prose of common life.

(Novalis; quoted in James Burton Robertson, “Life and Writings of Novalis,” The Dublin Review, Vol. III, 1837, pp. 300–301).

449: A Drama Soliloquized.

447: Um Maravilhoso Canalha.

O líder é um canalha. Dirá alguém que estou generalizando. Exato: estou generalizando. Vejam, por exemplo, Stalin. Ninguém mais líder. Lenin pode ser esquecido, Stalin, não. Um dia, os camponeses insinuaram uma resistência. Stalin não teve nem dúvida, nem pena. Matou, de fome punitiva; 12 milhões de camponeses. Nem mais, nem menos: — 12 milhões. Era um maravilhoso canalha e, portanto, o líder puro.

E não foi traído. Aí está o mistério que, realmente, não é mistério. É uma verdade historicamente demonstrada: — o canalha, quando investido de liderança, faz, inventa, aglutina e dinamiza massas de canalhas. Façam a seguinte experiência: — ponham um santo na primeira esquina. Trepado num caixote, ele fala ao povo. Mas não convencerá ninguém, e repito: — ninguém o seguirá. Invertam a experiência e coloquem na mesma esquina, e em cima do mesmo caixote, um pulha indubitável. Instantaneamente, outros pulhas, legiões de pulhas, sairão atrás do chefe abjeto.

(Nelson Rodrigues, “Assim é um Líder.” In: O Óbvio Ululante. São Paulo: Companhia das Letras, 1993).

447: Um Maravilhoso Canalha.